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Openstack Weekend Batch

Red Hat OpenStack Platform

When your cloud performs better, so does your business

Your IT department is being challenged to react faster to growing customer demands. If you’re like many IT organizations, you’re exploring Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) private clouds, like OpenStack, to swiftly deploy and scale IT infrastructure. But not just any OpenStack cloud can deliver the demands of a production-scale environment and meet your performance, scalability, and security standards. Fortunately, Red Hat OpenStack Platform does all this and more.

FEATURES & BENEFITS

Co-engineered performance

It matters which OpenStack distribution and which Linux offering you choose. This is why we—recognizing the critical interdependencies between the two—co-engineer OpenStack and Linux together with closely aligned product teams.

Built-in security

Red Hat has earned some of the highest security credentials, including those from the U.S. Department of Defense and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. SELinux military-grade security technologies prevent intrusions and protect data when running in public or private OpenStack clouds.

Managed cloud

Keep an eye on all the moving parts of your OpenStack environment with Red Hat CloudForms. Integrated as part of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, Red Hat CloudForms is a unified management system that is designed for hybrid environments.

No more vendor dependency

Proprietary solutions are largely restricted to the providers’ own ecosystems. Don’t make it that difficult. Use the open technologies of Red Hat OpenStack Platform with your existing infrastructure.

Keep the updates rolling or standardize for the long term

Keep up with rapid innovation and the latest OpenStack features using our integrated director for live updates and upgrades. Standardize on a single, long-life version with the comfort that comes with up to 5 years of support, and add an extra 2 years with a Red Hat Enterprise Linux Extended Update Support Add-On subscription

 

Red Hat OpenShift

CLOUD COMPUTING

Red Hat OpenShift

Enterprise Kubernetes and more

Red Hat OpenShift is a container application platform that brings docker and Kubernetes to the enterprise. Regardless of your applications architecture, OpenShift lets you easily and quickly build, develop, and deploy in nearly any infrastructure, public or private. Whether it’s on-premise, in a public cloud, or hosted, you have an award-winning platform to get your next big idea to market ahead of your competition.

FEATURES & BENEFITS

Enterprise Kubernetes
Red Hat OpenShift is a complete container application platform that natively integrates technologies like docker and Kubernetes—a powerful container cluster management and orchestration system—and combines that with an enterprise foundation in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

OpenShift integrates the architecture, processes, platforms, and services needed to empower development and operations teams.
Stateful and stateless apps
Red Hat OpenShift runs and supports both stateful and stateless applications. This allows you to take full advantage of containers without needing to completely rearchitect your enterprise apps.

Application alt icon

Stateful and stateless apps

Red Hat OpenShift runs and supports both stateful and stateless applications. This allows you to take full advantage of containers without needing to completely rearchitect your enterprise apps.

Read the OpenShift datasheet

Modernize your apps
OpenShift combined with Red Hat JBoss Middleware provides composable cloud-native services, including developer tools, integration, business automation, data management, and more. So you can develop applications faster, smarter, more flexibly, and overcome challenges of building distributed systems with microservices.

Learn how KeyBank sped up delivery from every 3 months to every week
Build a better, stronger hybrid cloud
You can deploy and support OpenShift anywhere Red Hat Enterprise Linux—the basis for many public and private clouds—is deployed and supported. This includes Amazon Web Services, Azure, Google Cloud Platform, VMware, and more. With OpenShift, you can provide a single container application platform across these public and private clouds, and with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform on Microsoft Azure, you can build, deploy, and manage containerized services and applications.

Embrace DevOps

OpenShift provides development and operations teams with a common platform and set of tools. This aligns both teams to a common, continuous application development and maintenance workflow. With this approach, you can eliminate slow processes and manual paths to operate at the pace your business demands.

Puzzle piece

 

What is Ansible?

MANAGEMENT

Ansible by Red Hat

Deploy apps. Manage systems. Crush complexity.

In a complex IT environment, even the smallest tasks can take forever. Sprawling systems are hard to develop, deploy, and maintain. Business demands only increase complexity, and IT teams struggle with management, availability, and cost.

Ansible is simple, agentless IT automation technology that can improve your current processes, migrate applications for better optimization, and provide a single language for DevOps practices across your organization.

FEATURES & BENEFITS

Automation across IT

Repetitive tasks are automated using a simple, human-readable language that anyone in your IT organization can understand.

Ansible diagram image

Tackle complex challenges

Ansible and Ansible Tower by Red Hat are a complete automation platform capable of provisioning, deploying applications, orchestrating complex workflows, and managing the configuration of your IT systems, networks, and apps all of which help you solve real business problems.

Ansible diagram image

Reduce repetition

Ansible is extremely powerful, talking to the systems, applications, and tools you’re already using and reducing the complexity of existing environments and processes.

Get started simply

Ansible is agentless, so there’s no software to install on the things you’re automating. This makes it easy to get started and helps IT teams collaborate—whether their focus is networking, development, infrastructure, applications, or security.

The power of community

Ansible is the most popular automation tool in GitHub. With thousands of contributors, hundreds of modules, and many thousands of community-provided automation roles in Ansible Galaxy, you can not only learn and begin to use Ansible quickly, but benefit from community-contributed roles that will help you automate even faster. And best of all, you can trust that Ansible is backed by Red Hat, the world’s leader in open source.

community image

What’s a Linux container?

Linux container is a set of processes that are isolated from the rest of the system, running from a distinct image that provides all files necessary to support the processes. By providing an image that contains all of an application’s dependencies, it is portable and consistent as it moves from development, to testing, and finally to production.

What is a container

To put a finer point on it, imagine you’re developing an application. You do your work on a laptop and your environment has a specific configuration. Other developers may have slightly different configurations. The application you’re developing relies on that configuration and is dependent on specific files. Meanwhile, your business has test and production environments which are standardized with their own configurations and their own sets of supporting files. You want to emulate those environments as much as possible locally, but without all of the overhead of recreating the server environments. So, how do you make your app work across these environments, pass quality assurance, and get your app deployed without massive headaches, rewriting, and break-fixing? The answer: Containers. The container that holds your application has the necessary configurations (and files) so that you can move it from development, to test, to production without all of the nasty side effects. Crisis averted–everyone’s happy.

That’s a simplified example, but Linux containers can be applied to problems in many different ways where ultimate portability, configurability, and isolation is needed. No matter the infrastructure—on-premise, in the cloud, or a hybrid of the two—containers meet the demand.

Isn’t this just virtualization?

Yes and no. Here’s an easy way to think about the two:

  • Virtualization lets many operating systems run simultaneously on a single system.
  • Containers share the same operating system kernel and isolate the application processes from the rest of the system.
virtualization vs containers

What does this mean? For starters, having multiple operating systems running on a hypervisor, the software that makes virtualization work, isn’t as lightweight as using containers. When you have finite resources with finite capabilities, you need lightweight apps that can be densely deployed. Linux containers run from that single operating system, sharing it across all of your containers, so your apps and services stay lightweight and run swiftly in parallel.


A brief history of containers

Evolution of containers download button

The idea of what we now call container technology first appeared in 2000 as FreeBSD jail, a technology that allows the partitioning of a FreeBSD system into multiple subsystems, or jails. Jails were developed as safe environments that a system administrator could share with multiple users inside or outside of an organization. In a jail, the intent was that processes get created in a modified chrooted environment—where access to the filesystem, networking, and users is virtualized—and could not escape or compromise the entire system. Jails were limited in implementation and methods for escaping the jailed environment were eventually discovered.

But the concept was compelling.

In 2001, an implementation of an isolated environment made its way into Linux, by way of Jacques Gélinas’ VServer project. As Gélinas put it, this was an effort to run “several general purpose Linux server [sic] on a single box with a high degree of Independence and security.” Once this foundation was set for multiple controlled userspaces in Linux, pieces began to fall into place to form what is today’s Linux container.

Containers become practical

Very quickly, more technologies combined to make this isolated approach a reality. Control groups (cgroups) is a kernel feature that controls and limits resource usage for a process or groups of processes. And systemd, an initialization system that sets up the userspace and manages their processes, is used by cgroups to provide greater control over these isolated processes. Both of these technologies, while adding overall control for Linux, were the framework for how environments could be successful in staying separated.

Advancements in user namespaces provided the next step for containers. User namespaces “allow per-namespace mappings of user and group IDs. In the context of containers, this means that users and groups may have privileges for certain operations inside the container without having those privileges outside the container.” This is similar to the concept of a jail, but with the added security of further isolation of processes, rather than jails’ concept of the modified environment.

The Linux Containers project (LXC) then added some much-needed tools, templates, libraries, and language bindings for these advancements–improving the user experience when using containers.

Enter Docker

In 2008, Docker came onto the scene (by way of dotCloud) with their eponymous container technology. The docker technology combines the work of LXC with further-improved tools for developers, increasing the user-friendliness of containers. Docker, an open source technology, is currently the most well-known project and method for deploying and managing Linux containers.

Today Red Hat and Docker, among many others, are members of the Open Container Initiative (OCI)—working toward open industry standardization of container technologies.


Standardization and the Open Container Initiative

The Open Container Initiative (OCI), part of the Linux Foundation, was launched in 2015 “for the express purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtime.” This project is focused on determining and setting specifications–currently two specs: Runtime and Image.

The Runtime Specification sets open standards around a filesystem bundle, the structure of supporting files and artifacts in a container, and how that bundle is unpacked by a compliant runtime. Basically, the spec exists to make sure containers work as intended and that all supporting assets are available and in the correct places.

OCI’s Image Specification defines how container images are created. This creation outputs “an image manifest, a filesystem serialization, and an image configuration.

These specifications work together to define what’s in a container image and its dependencies, environments, arguments, etc. necessary for the image to be run properly.


Containers are an abstraction

Linux containers are another evolutionary leap in how we develop, deploy, and manage applications. Linux container images provide portability and version control, helping ensure that what works on a developer’s laptop also works in production.

A running Linux container is less resource intensive than a virtual machine, but retains much of the application isolation, and is more easily managed as part of a larger application.

The point of Linux containers is being able to develop faster and meet business needs as they arise, rather than the which software you’re using to do that work. Don’t limit yourself to thinking of containers as holding the single application: You can use containers to hold parts of an application or services. Then you can use other technologies, such as Kubernetes, to automate and orchestrate your containerized apps. A container hosts application logic, a runtime, and dependencies, so your container can include everything, or you can build an application that comprises many containers working as microservices.


Containers in production environments

Containers are a great way to deliver software and applications to your customers faster. That means using them in production environments. And that means higher stakes for the processes running on those containers.

Fortunately Red Hat’s there to help. Red Hat has a long history of working in the open source community to make technologies–like containers–secure, stable, and reliable. It’s what we do. Then we support those technologies. So if you need help, we’re there.

Red Hat’s technologies take all of the guesswork out of doing containers the right way. Whether it’s getting your development teams on a platform built with containers in mind, running your container infrastructure on a best-in-class operating system, or providing storage solutions for the massive data generated by containers, Red Hat’s solutions have you covered.

What’s a Linux container?

Linux container is a set of processes that are isolated from the rest of the system, running from a distinct image that provides all files necessary to support the processes. By providing an image that contains all of an application’s dependencies, it is portable and consistent as it moves from development, to testing, and finally to production.

What is a container

To put a finer point on it, imagine you’re developing an application. You do your work on a laptop and your environment has a specific configuration. Other developers may have slightly different configurations. The application you’re developing relies on that configuration and is dependent on specific files. Meanwhile, your business has test and production environments which are standardized with their own configurations and their own sets of supporting files. You want to emulate those environments as much as possible locally, but without all of the overhead of recreating the server environments. So, how do you make your app work across these environments, pass quality assurance, and get your app deployed without massive headaches, rewriting, and break-fixing? The answer: Containers. The container that holds your application has the necessary configurations (and files) so that you can move it from development, to test, to production without all of the nasty side effects. Crisis averted–everyone’s happy.

That’s a simplified example, but Linux containers can be applied to problems in many different ways where ultimate portability, configurability, and isolation is needed. No matter the infrastructure—on-premise, in the cloud, or a hybrid of the two—containers meet the demand.

Isn’t this just virtualization?

Yes and no. Here’s an easy way to think about the two:

  • Virtualization lets many operating systems run simultaneously on a single system.
  • Containers share the same operating system kernel and isolate the application processes from the rest of the system.
virtualization vs containers

What does this mean? For starters, having multiple operating systems running on a hypervisor, the software that makes virtualization work, isn’t as lightweight as using containers. When you have finite resources with finite capabilities, you need lightweight apps that can be densely deployed. Linux containers run from that single operating system, sharing it across all of your containers, so your apps and services stay lightweight and run swiftly in parallel.


A brief history of containers

Evolution of containers download button

The idea of what we now call container technology first appeared in 2000 as FreeBSD jail, a technology that allows the partitioning of a FreeBSD system into multiple subsystems, or jails. Jails were developed as safe environments that a system administrator could share with multiple users inside or outside of an organization. In a jail, the intent was that processes get created in a modified chrooted environment—where access to the filesystem, networking, and users is virtualized—and could not escape or compromise the entire system. Jails were limited in implementation and methods for escaping the jailed environment were eventually discovered.

But the concept was compelling.

In 2001, an implementation of an isolated environment made its way into Linux, by way of Jacques Gélinas’ VServer project. As Gélinas put it, this was an effort to run “several general purpose Linux server [sic] on a single box with a high degree of Independence and security.” Once this foundation was set for multiple controlled userspaces in Linux, pieces began to fall into place to form what is today’s Linux container.

Containers become practical

Very quickly, more technologies combined to make this isolated approach a reality. Control groups (cgroups) is a kernel feature that controls and limits resource usage for a process or groups of processes. And systemd, an initialization system that sets up the userspace and manages their processes, is used by cgroups to provide greater control over these isolated processes. Both of these technologies, while adding overall control for Linux, were the framework for how environments could be successful in staying separated.

Advancements in user namespaces provided the next step for containers. User namespaces “allow per-namespace mappings of user and group IDs. In the context of containers, this means that users and groups may have privileges for certain operations inside the container without having those privileges outside the container.” This is similar to the concept of a jail, but with the added security of further isolation of processes, rather than jails’ concept of the modified environment.

The Linux Containers project (LXC) then added some much-needed tools, templates, libraries, and language bindings for these advancements–improving the user experience when using containers.

Enter Docker

In 2008, Docker came onto the scene (by way of dotCloud) with their eponymous container technology. The docker technology combines the work of LXC with further-improved tools for developers, increasing the user-friendliness of containers. Docker, an open source technology, is currently the most well-known project and method for deploying and managing Linux containers.

Today Red Hat and Docker, among many others, are members of the Open Container Initiative (OCI)—working toward open industry standardization of container technologies.


Standardization and the Open Container Initiative

The Open Container Initiative (OCI), part of the Linux Foundation, was launched in 2015 “for the express purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtime.” This project is focused on determining and setting specifications–currently two specs: Runtime and Image.

The Runtime Specification sets open standards around a filesystem bundle, the structure of supporting files and artifacts in a container, and how that bundle is unpacked by a compliant runtime. Basically, the spec exists to make sure containers work as intended and that all supporting assets are available and in the correct places.

OCI’s Image Specification defines how container images are created. This creation outputs “an image manifest, a filesystem serialization, and an image configuration.

These specifications work together to define what’s in a container image and its dependencies, environments, arguments, etc. necessary for the image to be run properly.


Containers are an abstraction

Linux containers are another evolutionary leap in how we develop, deploy, and manage applications. Linux container images provide portability and version control, helping ensure that what works on a developer’s laptop also works in production.

A running Linux container is less resource intensive than a virtual machine, but retains much of the application isolation, and is more easily managed as part of a larger application.

The point of Linux containers is being able to develop faster and meet business needs as they arise, rather than the which software you’re using to do that work. Don’t limit yourself to thinking of containers as holding the single application: You can use containers to hold parts of an application or services. Then you can use other technologies, such as Kubernetes, to automate and orchestrate your containerized apps. A container hosts application logic, a runtime, and dependencies, so your container can include everything, or you can build an application that comprises many containers working as microservices.


Containers in production environments

Containers are a great way to deliver software and applications to your customers faster. That means using them in production environments. And that means higher stakes for the processes running on those containers.

Fortunately Red Hat’s there to help. Red Hat has a long history of working in the open source community to make technologies–like containers–secure, stable, and reliable. It’s what we do. Then we support those technologies. So if you need help, we’re there.

Red Hat’s technologies take all of the guesswork out of doing containers the right way. Whether it’s getting your development teams on a platform built with containers in mind, running your container infrastructure on a best-in-class operating system, or providing storage solutions for the massive data generated by containers, Red Hat’s solutions have you covered.